Factors influencing carbon-labeled product purchase intentions: A case study in Vietnam

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This study aims to examine university students’ intention to purchase carbon-labeled products in Can Tho City, Vietnam, as well as the main reasons driving the desire to purchase carbon-labeled products. A survey was conducted using quantitative analytic methodologies, and 234 students’ responses were obtained using Google Forms during the third quarter of 2023. Before surveying student participants, ten educational experts crafted and reviewed a questionnaire. The questionnaire had three sections. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and SPSS are used to assess the data. This study analyzed independent variables such as sustainable consumption habits, the green halo effect, carbon label visibility, and climate consciousness to consider their impact on the dependent variable of purchase intention. To guarantee the dependability of these variables, Cronbach’s Alpha was employed with a threshold set at 0.60. The findings demonstrate Vietnamese students’ comparatively low level of understanding regarding carbon labeling. Only 45.7% of the 234 survey participants claimed to have heard of carbon labels, compared to 54.3% who said they had never heard of them. Furthermore, sustainable consumption habits and the green halo effect directly impact the intentions to purchase carbon-labeled products, in which sustainable consumer habits play the most critical role. Carbon label visibility and climate consciousness do not directly influence the intention to buy, but these factors contribute to increasing purchase intention.

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    • Figure 1. Theoretical framework
    • Figure 2. Direct and indirect impacts on the intention to buy items with carbon labeling
    • Table 1. Sample structure
    • Table 2. Cronbach’s alpha analysis
    • Table 3. Exploratory factor analysis
    • Table 4. Construct validity assessment
    • Table 5. Fit indices for the CFA measurement model
    • Table 6. Model’s findings
    • Table A1. Questionaire items
    • Conceptualization
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Data curation
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Formal Analysis
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Funding acquisition
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Investigation
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Methodology
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Project administration
      Luan Nguyen
    • Resources
      Luan Nguyen
    • Software
      Luan Nguyen
    • Supervision
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Validation
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Visualization
      Luan Nguyen
    • Writing – original draft
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh
    • Writing – review & editing
      Luan Nguyen, Thien Pham Huynh