Does the perception of training in labor law knowledge affect job satisfaction and organizational commitment in commercial banks?

  • 129 Views
  • 42 Downloads

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

This study investigates the relationship and the magnitude of the influence of perceived training in labor law knowledge on employees’ organizational commitment, with job satisfaction as a mediating factor. The study concentrates on the commercial banking sector in Vietnam, an emerging developing country in Southeast Asia. Data were gathered through interviews with 496 employees from 20 commercial banks in Vietnam. Applying partial least squares structural equation modeling, the analysis indicates that employees’ perceptions of training in labor law knowledge have both direct and indirect effects on their job satisfaction and organizational commitment. The perceived motivation for training, perceived benefits of training, perceived availability of training, and perceived support from management and colleagues all serve as significant mediators in this relationship. Notably, increased job satisfaction significantly contributes to a positive impact on employees’ commitment to the organization. However, the study results suggest that employees’ perceived benefits of labor law training do not have a significant influence on their commitment to the organization. Nonetheless, these results serve as a foundation for managerial implications, offering valuable insights to enterprise managers in the commercial bank sector to improve future labor law training.

Acknowledgment
This collaborative research involves scholars from the University of Law – Hue University and Duy Tan University. The authors extend their gratitude to both institutions for their support and assistance in facilitating the publication of this research.

view full abstract hide full abstract
    • Figure 1. Conceptual model and hypotheses
    • Figure 2. Path analysis results
    • Table 1. Scale measures of detailed variables used in the study
    • Table 2. Descriptive statistics
    • Table 3. Descriptive statistics, internal reliability, and convergent reliability
    • Table 4. Result of discriminant reliability
    • Table 5. Inner VIF, f-square test results
    • Table 6. Results of evaluating the predictability of the model
    • Table 7. Results of testing the research hypotheses
    • Conceptualization
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Data curation
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Formal Analysis
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Investigation
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Methodology
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Project administration
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Resources
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Software
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Supervision
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Validation
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Visualization
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Writing – original draft
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh
    • Writing – review & editing
      Diep Dao Mong, Hai Phan Thanh