Korean Wave in Indonesia: Are there any changes in perception and intention to visit Korea?

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South Korea has a good image overseas due to the success of its national branding. With the Korean Wave as their national branding, Koreans introduce their country and culture through Korean entertainment. Indonesia is one of the Asian countries exposed to the Korean Wave, especially Korean dramas. This paper aims to analyze the determinants of changes in perceptions and the desire of Indonesians to visit South Korea as a tourist destination. International strategy theory, international marketing theory, and Korean Wave types are analyzed. The research sample consists of 237 randomly selected Korean Wave fans and non-fans. Data were collected using a questionnaire adapted and modified from previous studies. Respondents received questionnaires on-line via Google Forms. Multiple linear regression analysis was used in this study. The findings show that international strategy and marketing can adequately explain changes in the perception and desire of Indonesians to visit South Korea as a tourist destination. The Korean Wave has a positive and significant effect on changes in public perceptions toward Korea. The significant level of 0.000 <0.05 concludes that the four Korean Wave variables (Korean music, food, dramas, and products)simultaneously have a positive effect on changes in the perception of Indonesians people toward South Korea. However, K-pop and K-food were not found to determine the intention to visit South Korea as a tourist destination.

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    • Figure 1. Normality test for the first model (Y1)
    • Figure 2. Scatter plot of heteroscedasticity test in the first model (Y1)
    • Figure 3. Normality test for the second model (Y2)
    • Figure 4. Scatter plot for the second model (Y2)
    • Table 1. Respondent profile
    • Table 2. Validity test
    • Table 3. Reliability test
    • Table 4. Multicollinearity test for the first model (Y1)
    • Table 5. Autocorrelation test for the first model (Y1)
    • Table 6. Multicollinearity test for the second model (Y2)
    • Table 7. Autocorrelation test for the second model (Y2)
    • Table 8. Estimation results for the first model (Y1)
    • Table 9. F-test for the first model (Y1)
    • Table 10. Goodness of fit test (Y1)
    • Table 11. Estimation results for the second model (Y2)
    • Table 12. F-test for the second model (Y2)
    • Table 13. Goodness of fit test for the second model (Y2)
    • Table 14. Summary of the hypotheses results
    • Conceptualization
      Melisa Melisa, Suyanto Suyanto, Olivia Tanaya
    • Data curation
      Melisa Melisa
    • Formal Analysis
      Melisa Melisa, Suyanto Suyanto, Olivia Tanaya
    • Investigation
      Melisa Melisa
    • Methodology
      Melisa Melisa, Suyanto Suyanto, Olivia Tanaya
    • Project administration
      Melisa Melisa, Suyanto Suyanto
    • Resources
      Melisa Melisa
    • Writing – original draft
      Melisa Melisa, Suyanto Suyanto, Olivia Tanaya
    • Writing – review & editing
      Melisa Melisa, Suyanto Suyanto, Olivia Tanaya
    • Funding acquisition
      Suyanto Suyanto
    • Supervision
      Suyanto Suyanto, Olivia Tanaya
    • Validation
      Suyanto Suyanto, Olivia Tanaya
    • Software
      Olivia Tanaya