Financial literacy among management students: Insights from universities in Nepal

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This study aims to examine the degree of financial literacy and practices of financial knowledge among MBA students in Nepal. Four prominent universities were selected for study: Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu University, Pokhara University, and Purbanchal University. The descriptive and analytical research approach was applied to analyze the data. Data were collected through questionnaires from 320 students by using convenience and stratified sampling methods. The analysis was conducted using the SPSS software system. The results highlight the complex interplay of factors influencing financial behavior and literacy among MBA students, emphasizing the importance of education, familial influence, and media exposure in shaping financial attitudes and decision-making. The study delves into several key aspects of financial behavior, influence, attitude, literacy, and knowledge sources among MBA students. Notably, respondents displayed positive financial behaviors such as reading for knowledge enhancement and prudent spending practices. Parental influence emerged as the most significant factor shaping financial decisions, followed by media and internet exposure. Respondents generally exhibited a favorable financial outlook and demonstrated understanding in various financial literacy domains, though areas for improvement, particularly in investment risk comprehension, were identified. The study shows how education, family influence, and media exposure affect MBA student’s financial think, how people handle finance, like their education and where they get information from. This is seen as reflected in financial literacy scores ranging from 1.43 to 3.86, with an average of 2.405 and a standard deviation of 0.449, suggesting below-average scores and reduced unpredictability.

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    • Table 1. Descriptive statistics toward financial behavior
    • Table 2. Overall mean and standard deviation of financial behavior
    • Table 3. Descriptive statistics of financial influence
    • Table 4. Overall mean and standard deviation of financial influence
    • Table 5. Frequency and percentage of activities learned at home while grouping
    • Table 6. Descriptive statistics of financial attitude
    • Table 7. Overall mean and standard deviation of financial attitude
    • Table 8. Descriptive statistics of financial literacy
    • Table 9. Overall mean and standard deviation of financial literacy Conceptualization: Achyut Gyawali, Khom Raj Kharel, Bisna Acharya.
    • Conceptualization
      Khom Raj Kharel, Bisna Acharya, Achyut Gyawali
    • Formal Analysis
      Khom Raj Kharel, Dhruba Kumar Budhathoki, Achyut Gyawali
    • Funding acquisition
      Khom Raj Kharel, Bisna Acharya
    • Investigation
      Khom Raj Kharel, Bisna Acharya, Achyut Gyawali
    • Resources
      Khom Raj Kharel
    • Project administration
      Khom Raj Kharel, Bisna Acharya, Dhruba Kumar Budhathoki
    • Supervision
      Khom Raj Kharel, Achyut Gyawali
    • Validation
      Khom Raj Kharel
    • Writing – original draft
      Khom Raj Kharel, Yadav Mani Upadhyaya, Achyut Gyawali
    • Writing – review & editing
      Khom Raj Kharel, Bisna Acharya, Dhruba Kumar Budhathoki, Achyut Gyawali
    • Data curation
      Yadav Mani Upadhyaya, Bisna Acharya, Dhruba Kumar Budhathoki
    • Methodology
      Yadav Mani Upadhyaya, Achyut Gyawali
    • Software
      Yadav Mani Upadhyaya, Achyut Gyawali
    • Visualization
      Yadav Mani Upadhyaya, Bisna Acharya