Resilience and vulnerability of Ukrainians: The role of family during the war

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The full-scale russian invasion of Ukraine led to numerous physical and moral challenges. The paper aims to estimate the role of family as a social resilience driver in managing wartime challenges on a regional level. It used the online survey method based on Google Forms and online focus-group interviews in September-November 2022. Household members (1,089 respondents) of Kyiv, Lviv, Zakarpattia, Mykolaiv, Sumy, Chernihiv, and Dnipropetrovsk territorial communities were surveyed. Most respondents generally positively assess Ukraine’s prospects; 59% believe that the situation in the country will most likely improve. During war escalation, 67.2% of respondents waited for family support, and 48.8% helped their relatives, but relying on family support did not increase their safety expectations. In communities that did not increase their activity level in response to the war by one percentage point, the “feeling unsafe” responses increased by 1.8 percentage points, which means that an active civil position is also responsible for feeling safe (other things being equal) and increasing society’s resilience. At the same time, even in wartime, the indicators of social atomization are quite high, as 46.2% relied only on themselves and solved their problems independently, without anyone’s help. Therefore, developing family relations is one of the effective mechanisms for raising internal human resources to manage wartime challenges.

Acknowledgment
This study was supported by a project “Digital transformations to ensure civil protection and post-war economic recovery in the face of environmental and social challenges” (№0124U000549) and “Economic and energy security of Ukraine in the conditions of war and post-war reconstruction: disruptive technologies for sustainable development” (№0123U103593).

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    • Figure 1. Values and priorities of Ukrainians. Dynamic changes, %
    • Figure 2. Support expectations, applications, and provisions
    • Table 1. Polled households according to their vulnerabilities
    • Table 2. Resettlement of Ukrainian residents during the full-scale russian invasion
    • Table 3. Home return plans during the full-scale russian invasion
    • Table 4. The psychological state of family members
    • Table 5. Subjective level of own security at home
    • Table 6. Have the members of your family become more active in answering the war challenges (by region)?
    • Table 7. Empirical estimation of relations between active position by family members during the war and feeling safe
    • Table A1. Empirical estimation of relations between feeling completely safe and relying on help from family
    • Table A2. Empirical estimation of relations between feeling feel more or less safe and relying on help from family
    • Conceptualization
      Andriana Kostenko, Oksana Osetrova
    • Data curation
      Andriana Kostenko, Oksana Osetrova
    • Investigation
      Andriana Kostenko, Oleksandr Kubatko, Mykola Nazarov, Vitalii Stepanov
    • Methodology
      Andriana Kostenko, Oksana Osetrova
    • Resources
      Andriana Kostenko, Volodymyr Semenov
    • Software
      Andriana Kostenko, Volodymyr Semenov, Oksana Osetrova
    • Validation
      Andriana Kostenko, Volodymyr Semenov, Oksana Osetrova
    • Visualization
      Andriana Kostenko, Mykola Nazarov, Vitalii Stepanov
    • Writing – original draft
      Andriana Kostenko, Oleksandr Kubatko, Mykola Nazarov, Vitalii Stepanov
    • Writing – review & editing
      Andriana Kostenko, Volodymyr Semenov, Oleksandr Kubatko
    • Funding acquisition
      Volodymyr Semenov, Oksana Osetrova, Oleksandr Kubatko
    • Formal Analysis
      Oksana Osetrova, Oleksandr Kubatko, Mykola Nazarov, Vitalii Stepanov
    • Project administration
      Oksana Osetrova
    • Supervision
      Oleksandr Kubatko