Environmental behavior practice in government agencies: Evidence from Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

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Environmental behavior (EB) is a kind of organizational behavior that seeks to protect the natural environment and conserve resources, such as saving energy, recycling wastes, duplex printing, reducing water use, non-smoking in the workplace, and designing environmentally friendly products. This study aims to identify the degree of environmental behavior practice and examine its constraints in Saudi government agencies. This study is based on a single design of cross-sectional research. 436 responses were collected from employees of government agencies in Saudi Arabia. The study results indicated that the EB practice is generally high in government agencies.
Furthermore, the results revealed that female employees in government agencies have no statistical difference from male employees. In other words, the EB practice of men and women in government agencies is equal. The study also found a significant difference between married, unmarried, and divorced groups. Divorced employees report a higher level of EB than other employee groups. However, the study indicated a significant difference between the high school, graduate, and postgraduate groups. In other words, employees with high school education have a higher level of EB. Receiving and not receiving leadership support have a significant difference, whereas employees who received environmental training reported higher levels of EB than others. The outcomes also indicated a difference between the group of employees who have religious values. The outcomes of this study may be of benefit to researchers, regulators, policymakers, managers, and governors.

Acknowledgment
The author thanks the Deanship of Scientific Research at King Saud University for supporting this study.

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    • Figure 1. Theory of planned behavior model
    • Table 1. Description of study participants
    • Table 2. Means (M) and standard deviation (SD) of environmental behavior
    • Table 3. Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests
    • Table A1. Questionnaire table
    • Conceptualization
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Data curation
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Formal Analysis
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Funding acquisition
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Investigation
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Methodology
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Project administration
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Resources
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Software
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Supervision
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Writing – original draft
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj
    • Writing – review & editing
      Abdulmalek Taher Alhajj