Employee value proposition: Which factors matter? A Swiss case study on motivational factors

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Companies are developing strategies to attract and retain talented workforce in an always more effervescent labor market. The ones that relate to attracting talents are usually referred to as employer branding, and the ones related to retaining talents are usually referred to as employee value propositions. This study aims to investigate the motivational factors in the employee value proposition model and suggest an extension of the common models. A questionnaire was elaborated to check the validity of the hypothetical model. The sample includes a large Swiss financial institution that decided to remain anonymous. 517 employees have provided valid observations; the multivariate analysis conducted under the lenses of structural equation modeling confirms the validity of the hypothetical model. In particular, the study illustrates that extrinsic (salary, benefits, career) and intrinsic (work environment, work purpose, and job strain) motivational factors must be considered in the employee value proposition model. The intrinsic motivational factors contribute slightly more than the extrinsic motivational factors; the salary factor contributes the most among the extrinsic motivation variables, and the working environment factor contributes the most among the intrinsic motivation variables. The elaborated model has practical application for corporations who want to govern their employee value proposition and align their employer branding identity. It extends the theoretical foundations to support further research in this domain.

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    • Figure 1. Factor loadings
    • Table 1. Factor analysis results
    • Table 2. Construct reliability and validity values
    • Table 3. HTMT values
    • Table 4. Fornell-Lacker criterion
    • Table 5. Total effects
    • Table 6. Contribution of items on employee value proposition
    • Table 7. Total item weight
    • Table 8. Meaningful factors in the employee value proposition
    • Table A1. Item description
    • Conceptualization
      Xavier Bronlet, Jessica Basile, Roberta Basile
    • Data curation
      Xavier Bronlet
    • Formal Analysis
      Xavier Bronlet
    • Investigation
      Xavier Bronlet, Jessica Basile, Roberta Basile, Nicola Ferla
    • Methodology
      Xavier Bronlet, Roberta Basile
    • Resources
      Xavier Bronlet, Jessica Basile, Roberta Basile, Nicola Ferla
    • Supervision
      Xavier Bronlet
    • Validation
      Xavier Bronlet, Jessica Basile, Roberta Basile, Nicola Ferla
    • Visualization
      Xavier Bronlet, Nicola Ferla
    • Writing – original draft
      Xavier Bronlet, Jessica Basile, Roberta Basile, Nicola Ferla
    • Writing – review & editing
      Xavier Bronlet, Jessica Basile, Roberta Basile, Nicola Ferla
    • Project administration
      Jessica Basile